• Chapter 1. Installing and Configuring Windows Server 2003
  • software development Company Server 2003
  • Chapter 1. Installing and Configuring Windows Server 2003
  • New Features in Windows Server 2003
  • Best Practices
  • Moving Forward
  • Version Comparisons
  • Hardware Recommendations
  • Installation Checklist
  • Functional Overview of Windows Server 2003 Setup
  • Installing Windows Server 2003
  • Post Setup Configurations
  • Functional Description of the Windows Server 2003 Boot Process
  • Correcting Common Setup Problems
  • Chapter 2. Performing Upgrades and Automated Installations
  • New Features in Windows Server 2003
  • NT4 Upgrade Functional Overview
  • Upgrading an NT4 or Windows 2000 Server
  • Automating Windows Server 2003 Deployments
  • Moving Forward
  • Chapter 3. Adding Hardware
  • New Features in Windows Server 2003
  • Functional Description of Windows Server 2003 Architecture
  • Overview of Windows Server 2003 Plug and Play
  • Installing and Configuring Devices
  • Troubleshooting New Devices
  • Moving Forward
  • Chapter 4. Managing NetBIOS Name Resolution
  • New Features in Windows Server 2003
  • Moving Forward
  • Overview of Windows Server 2003 Networking
  • Name Resolution and Network Services
  • Network Diagnostic Utilities
  • Resolving NetBIOS Names Using Broadcasts
  • Resolving NetBIOS Names Using Lmhosts
  • Resolving NetBIOS Names Using WINS
  • Managing WINS
  • Disabling NetBIOS-over-TCP/IP Name Resolution
  • Chapter 5. Managing DNS
  • New Features in Windows Server 2003
  • Configuring a Caching-Only Server
  • Configuring a DNS Server to Use a Forwarder
  • Managing Dynamic DNS
  • Configuring Advanced DNS Server Parameters
  • Examining Zones with Nslookup
  • Command-Line Management of DNS
  • Configuring DHCP to Support DNS
  • Moving Forward
  • Overview of DNS Domain Structure
  • Functional Description of DNS Query Handling
  • Designing DNS Domains
  • Active Directory Integration
  • Configuring DNS Clients
  • Installing and Configuring DNS Servers
  • Configuring Secondary DNS Servers
  • Integrating DNS Zones into Active Directory
  • Chapter 6. Understanding Active Directory Services
  • New Features in Windows Server 2003
  • Active Directory Support Files
  • Active Directory Utilities
  • Bulk Imports and Exports
  • Moving Forward
  • Limitations of Classic NT Security
  • Directory Service Components
  • Brief History of Directory Services
  • X.500 Overview
  • LDAP Information Model
  • LDAP Namespace Structure
  • Active Directory Namespace Structure
  • Active Directory Schema
  • Chapter 7. Managing Active Directory Replication
  • New Features in Windows Server 2003
  • Replication Overview
  • Detailed Replication Transaction Descriptions
  • Designing Site Architectures
  • Configuring Inter-site Replication
  • Controlling Replication Parameters
  • Special Replication Operations
  • Troubleshooting Replication Problems
  • Moving Forward
  • Chapter 8. Designing Windows Server 2003 Domains
  • New Features in Windows Server 2003
  • Design Objectives
  • DNS and Active Directory Namespaces
  • Domain Design Strategies
  • Strategies for OU Design
  • Flexible Single Master Operations
  • Domain Controller Placement
  • Moving Forward
  • Chapter 9. Deploying Windows Server 2003 Domains
  • New Features in Windows Server 2003
  • Preparing for an NT Domain Upgrade
  • In-Place Upgrade of an NT4 Domain
  • In-Place Upgrade of a Windows 2000 Forest
  • Migrating from NT and Windows 2000 Domains to Windows Server 2003
  • Additional Domain Operations
  • Moving Forward
  • Chapter 10. Active Directory Maintenance
  • New Features in Windows Server 2003
  • Loss of a DNS Server
  • Loss of a Domain Controller
  • Loss of Key Replication Components
  • Backing Up the Directory
  • Performing Directory Maintenance
  • Moving Forward
  • Chapter 11. Understanding Network Access Security and Kerberos
  • New Features in Windows Server 2003
  • Windows Server 2003 Security Architecture
  • Security Components
  • Password Security
  • Authentication
  • Analysis of Kerberos Transactions
  • MITv5 Kerberos Interoperability
  • Security Auditing
  • Moving Forward
  • Chapter 12. Managing Group Policies
  • New Features in Windows Server 2003
  • Group Policy Operational Overview
  • Managing Individual Group Policy Types
  • Moving Forward
  • Chapter 13. Managing Active Directory Security
  • New Features in Windows Server 2003
  • Overview of Active Directory Security
  • Using Groups to Manage Active Directory Objects
  • Service Accounts
  • Using the Secondary Logon Service and RunAs
  • Using WMI for Active Directory Event Notification
  • Moving Forward
  • Chapter 14. Configuring Data Storage
  • New Features in Windows Server 2003
  • Functional Description of Windows Server 2003 Data Storage
  • Performing Disk Operations on IA32 Systems
  • Recovering Failed Fault Tolerant Disks
  • Working with GPT Disks
  • Moving Forward
  • Chapter 15. Managing File Systems
  • New Features in Windows Server 2003
  • Overview of Windows Server 2003 File Systems
  • NTFS Attributes
  • Link Tracking Service
  • Reparse Points
  • File System Recovery and Fault Tolerance
  • Quotas
  • File System Operations
  • Moving Forward
  • Chapter 16. Managing Shared Resources
  • New Features in Windows Server 2003
  • Functional Description of Windows Resource Sharing
  • Configuring File Sharing
  • Connecting to Shared Folders
  • Resource Sharing Using the Distributed File System (Dfs)
  • Printer Sharing
  • Configuring Windows Server 2003 Clients to Print
  • Managing Print Services
  • Moving Forward
  • Chapter 17. Managing File Encryption
  • New Features in Windows Server 2003
  • File Encryption Functional Description
  • Certificate Management
  • Encrypted File Recovery
  • Encrypting Server-Based Files
  • EFS File Transactions and WebDAV
  • Special EFS Guidelines
  • EFS Procedures
  • Moving Forward
  • Chapter 18. Managing a Public Key Infrastructure
  • New Features in Windows Server 2003
  • Moving Forward
  • PKI Goals
  • Cryptographic Elements in Windows Server 2003
  • Public/Private Key Services
  • Certificates
  • Certification Authorities
  • Certificate Enrollment
  • Key Archival and Recovery
  • Command-Line PKI Tools
  • Chapter 19. Managing the User Operating Environment
  • New Features in Windows Server 2003
  • Side-by-Side Assemblies
  • User State Migration
  • Managing Folder Redirection
  • Creating and Managing Home Directories
  • Managing Offline Files
  • Managing Servers via Remote Desktop
  • Moving Forward
  • Chapter 20. Managing Remote Access and Internet Routing
  • New Features in Windows Server 2003
  • Configuring a Network Bridge
  • Configuring Virtual Private Network Connections
  • Configuring Internet Authentication Services (IAS)
  • Moving Forward
  • Functional Description of WAN Device Support
  • PPP Authentication
  • NT4 RAS Servers and Active Directory Domains
  • Deploying Smart Cards for Remote Access
  • Installing and Configuring Modems
  • Configuring a Remote Access Server
  • Configuring a Demand-Dial Router
  • Configuring an Internet Gateway Using NAT
  • Chapter 21. Recovering from System Failures
  • New Features in Windows Server 2003
  • Functional Description Ntbackup
  • Backup and Restore Operations
  • Recovering from Blue Screen Stops
  • Using Emergency Management Services (EMS)
  • Using Safe Mode
  • Restoring Functionality with the Last Known Good Configuration
  • Recovery Console
  • Moving Forward
  • Who Should Read This Book
  • Who This Book Is Not For
  • Conventions
  • Acknowledgments
  • About the Author
  • About the Technical Reviewers
  • Index
  • Index A
  • Index B
  • Index C
  • Index D
  • Index E
  • Index F
  • Index G
  • Index H
  • Index I
  • Index J
  • Index K
  • Index L
  • Index M
  • Index N
  • Index O
  • Index P
  • Index Q
  • Index R
  • Index S
  • Index SYMBOL
  • Index T
  • Index U
  • Index V
  • Index W
  • Index X
  • Index Z
  • Preface
  • Previous Section Next Section

    In-Place Upgrade of a Windows 2000 Forest

    If you are in the fortunate position of having already finished your Windows 2000 deployment, the upgrade to Windows Server 2003 should not involve too much work. Servers that are suitable for Windows 2000 domain controllers should be adequate for Windows Server 2003, although you should think about upgrading hardware if you have a server skating near the minimums. Microsoft recommends a 550MHz processor, 256MB of RAM, 4GB of storage for the operating system, and sufficient space on the data drives to hold the Active Directory database files.

    The Active Directory database in Windows Server 2003 is somewhat larger than Windows 2000, but not enough to make a difference for storage calculations. If you are within 20 percent of filling the drive containing your current Active Directory files, you should be thinking about getting larger drives, whether or not you choose to upgrade.

    If you have multiple domain controllers in a site, you can do the upgrade during working hours, assuming that you have no other applications running on the server. Use caution not to disable the site bridgehead server, the sole Global Catalog server, or any FSMO role master during working hours.

    Probably the most exciting Active Directory feature in Windows Server 2003 is the ability create transitive, Kerberos-based trusts between two forests. To see how this works, the examples in this topic walk through an upgrade of two Windows 2000 forests with domains that share an External trust such as that shown in Figure 9.23.

    Figure 9.23. Windows 2000 forests with domains connected by an External trust.

    graphics/09fig23.gif

    In this diagram, users in the two domains share access to resources in their respective domains. A typical example is an extranet connection between a manufacturer and a vendor. Another example is a hospital on a university campus where the doctors are also members of the faculty and therefore need access to the main campus domain.

    The domain hosting the servers and the domain hosting the users have been configured with a two-way External trust. This mimics a classic NT trust in that it is really two, one-way trusts that use NTLM authentication, not Kerberos, so they are not transitive. This is why the domains trust each other directly and do not use trusts between the root domains.

    Upgrading the domains and forests in this configuration to Windows Server 2003 involves these major stages:

    1. Upgrade the schema and prepare the domains for upgrade.

    2. Upgrade the domain controllers in the root domains and shift the domain functional level to Windows Server 2003.

    3. Upgrade the domain controllers in the child domains and shift the domain functional level to Windows Server 2003.

    4. Shift the forest functional level to Windows Server 2003.

    5. Replace the External trust between the child domains with a Forest trust between the root domains.

    Schema Upgrade

    Before you can upgrade a Windows 2000 domain controller to Windows Server 2003, or introduce a Windows Server 2003 domain controller into a Windows 2000 domain, you must first upgrade the Windows 2000 schema. Windows Server 2003 makes over 400 changes to the schema, including new classes and attributes, changes to indexing, and changes to the attributes published in the Global Catalog. This last item requires a rebuild of the Global Catalog, which is then replicated to every GC server in the forest.

    In addition to big changes in the schema, Windows Server 2003 requires a few nips and tucks in the domains, as well. These changes support inter-forest connections and help to track domain updates.

    The utility that performs these schema and domain updates is called ADPREP. It is located in compressed form in the \I386 folder on the Windows Server 2003 CD.

    The simplest way to install ADPREP is to run winnt32 /checkupgradeonly from the Windows Server 2003 CD. This extracts ADPREP to the \WINNT\System32 folder and copies over 11 LDIF files, numbered Sch14.ldf through Sch24.ldf, that hold the new schema entries.

    The number assigned to these Sch##.ldf files correspond to schema version numbers. The Windows 2000 schema is version 13, which is why the Sch##.ldf files start at 14. Exchange 2000 also upgrades the schema, but it uses a separate set of LDAP Data Interchange Format (LDIF) files that do not change the schema version number.

    The ADPREP utility has two switches, both of which must be run prior to upgrading a Windows 2000 domain controller to Windows Server 2003 or installing a new Windows Server 2003 domain controller in an existing Windows 2000 domain:

    • adprep /forestprep. This switch performs the schema upgrade. It calls another utility, SCHUPGR, and feeds it the Sch##.ldf files in sequence. The /forestprep switch also updates Active Directory permissions and makes changes to the display specifiers to support the new classes.

    • adprep /domainprep. This switch applies new attributes to the Domain object that are used for maintaining trust quotas. It also adds a new container under System for tracking domain updates.

    You must be running Windows 2000 SP2 or later on all domain controllers in the forest prior to updating the schema. You must have administrator rights in the root domain of the forest along with membership in the Schema Admins group.

    Run adprep /forestprep at the Schema role master for the Windows 2000 forest. You can identify this server using the DUMPFSMOS command script from the Resource Kit. The syntax is dumpfsmos <dc_name>.

    The /domainprep switch must be run on the Infrastructure role master in each domain. You must have administrator rights in the domain. No changes are made to the schema. The /domainprep switch simply adds support for inter-forest trust quotas and adds a new container under the System container to track updates.

    Upgrade Windows 2000 Root Domains

    After the ADPREP changes have propagated to all domain controllers in the forest, you can begin upgrading the domain controllers in the root domains. Figure 9.24 shows the end result. Unlike upgrading an NT domain controller, the operating system and the directory service are upgraded at the same time in Windows 2000. The process can take quite a while, well over an hour in some cases, depending on the processor speed and any Registry translations that might need to be done.

    Figure 9.24. Windows 2000 forests following upgrade of root domains to Windows Server 2003.

    graphics/09fig24.gif

    You have the option of simply promoting a Windows Server 2003 member server as a domain controller rather than upgrading the existing domain controllers. If you decide to use this route, you must transfer all five FSMO roles to the new domain controllers prior to decommissioning the Windows 2000 DCs.

    DUMPFSMOS

    The DUMPFSMOS command script uses the Ntdsutil utility in batch form as follows:

    
    ntdsutil roles Connections "Connect to server %1" Quit "select 
    graphics/ccc.gifOperation Target"
    "List roles for connected server" Quit Quit Quit
    

    Actually, Ntdsutil only needs enough of each word to make an unambiguous entry, so the script could be abbreviated as follows:

    Ntdsutil r c "co t s %1" q "sel o t" "l r f c s" q q q
    

    If you decide to upgrade, it is a good idea to start with the PDC Emulator. This is not a requirement, but the PDC Emulator is the default server for editing group policies as well as the time standard and the Domain Master Browser, so you might as well get it out of the way first.

    As soon as you finish upgrading all domain controllers in the root domain, shift the domain to Windows Server 2003 functional level. Verify that the trust relationship to the child domains remains intact. Verify that administrators can still log on to the root domain and retain their enterprise privileges in the child domains.

    Upgrading Child Domains

    Now that the root domains have been upgraded, you're ready to start upgrading the child domains. Remember that you must prepare the domain with adprep /domainprep before upgrading the first domain controller. Figure 9.25 shows the final configuration with the forest functional level set at Windows Server 2003.

    Figure 9.25. Final stage of Windows 2000 upgrade with all domain controllers upgraded to Windows Server 2003.

    graphics/09fig25.gif

    As with the root domain, you should start the upgrades with the PDC Emulator. When you've completed upgrading all Windows 2000 domain controllers, shift the domain functional level to Windows Server 2003 then shift the forest functional level to Windows Server 2003.

    At this point, you can create a Forest trust between the forests. When this trust is in place, you can remove the External trust between the child domains. Verify that users can access resources in all domains through the Forest Root trust.

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