• Chapter 1. Installing and Configuring Windows Server 2003
  • software development Company Server 2003
  • Chapter 1. Installing and Configuring Windows Server 2003
  • New Features in Windows Server 2003
  • Best Practices
  • Moving Forward
  • Version Comparisons
  • Hardware Recommendations
  • Installation Checklist
  • Functional Overview of Windows Server 2003 Setup
  • Installing Windows Server 2003
  • Post Setup Configurations
  • Functional Description of the Windows Server 2003 Boot Process
  • Correcting Common Setup Problems
  • Chapter 2. Performing Upgrades and Automated Installations
  • New Features in Windows Server 2003
  • NT4 Upgrade Functional Overview
  • Upgrading an NT4 or Windows 2000 Server
  • Automating Windows Server 2003 Deployments
  • Moving Forward
  • Chapter 3. Adding Hardware
  • New Features in Windows Server 2003
  • Functional Description of Windows Server 2003 Architecture
  • Overview of Windows Server 2003 Plug and Play
  • Installing and Configuring Devices
  • Troubleshooting New Devices
  • Moving Forward
  • Chapter 4. Managing NetBIOS Name Resolution
  • New Features in Windows Server 2003
  • Moving Forward
  • Overview of Windows Server 2003 Networking
  • Name Resolution and Network Services
  • Network Diagnostic Utilities
  • Resolving NetBIOS Names Using Broadcasts
  • Resolving NetBIOS Names Using Lmhosts
  • Resolving NetBIOS Names Using WINS
  • Managing WINS
  • Disabling NetBIOS-over-TCP/IP Name Resolution
  • Chapter 5. Managing DNS
  • New Features in Windows Server 2003
  • Configuring a Caching-Only Server
  • Configuring a DNS Server to Use a Forwarder
  • Managing Dynamic DNS
  • Configuring Advanced DNS Server Parameters
  • Examining Zones with Nslookup
  • Command-Line Management of DNS
  • Configuring DHCP to Support DNS
  • Moving Forward
  • Overview of DNS Domain Structure
  • Functional Description of DNS Query Handling
  • Designing DNS Domains
  • Active Directory Integration
  • Configuring DNS Clients
  • Installing and Configuring DNS Servers
  • Configuring Secondary DNS Servers
  • Integrating DNS Zones into Active Directory
  • Chapter 6. Understanding Active Directory Services
  • New Features in Windows Server 2003
  • Active Directory Support Files
  • Active Directory Utilities
  • Bulk Imports and Exports
  • Moving Forward
  • Limitations of Classic NT Security
  • Directory Service Components
  • Brief History of Directory Services
  • X.500 Overview
  • LDAP Information Model
  • LDAP Namespace Structure
  • Active Directory Namespace Structure
  • Active Directory Schema
  • Chapter 7. Managing Active Directory Replication
  • New Features in Windows Server 2003
  • Replication Overview
  • Detailed Replication Transaction Descriptions
  • Designing Site Architectures
  • Configuring Inter-site Replication
  • Controlling Replication Parameters
  • Special Replication Operations
  • Troubleshooting Replication Problems
  • Moving Forward
  • Chapter 8. Designing Windows Server 2003 Domains
  • New Features in Windows Server 2003
  • Design Objectives
  • DNS and Active Directory Namespaces
  • Domain Design Strategies
  • Strategies for OU Design
  • Flexible Single Master Operations
  • Domain Controller Placement
  • Moving Forward
  • Chapter 9. Deploying Windows Server 2003 Domains
  • New Features in Windows Server 2003
  • Preparing for an NT Domain Upgrade
  • In-Place Upgrade of an NT4 Domain
  • In-Place Upgrade of a Windows 2000 Forest
  • Migrating from NT and Windows 2000 Domains to Windows Server 2003
  • Additional Domain Operations
  • Moving Forward
  • Chapter 10. Active Directory Maintenance
  • New Features in Windows Server 2003
  • Loss of a DNS Server
  • Loss of a Domain Controller
  • Loss of Key Replication Components
  • Backing Up the Directory
  • Performing Directory Maintenance
  • Moving Forward
  • Chapter 11. Understanding Network Access Security and Kerberos
  • New Features in Windows Server 2003
  • Windows Server 2003 Security Architecture
  • Security Components
  • Password Security
  • Authentication
  • Analysis of Kerberos Transactions
  • MITv5 Kerberos Interoperability
  • Security Auditing
  • Moving Forward
  • Chapter 12. Managing Group Policies
  • New Features in Windows Server 2003
  • Group Policy Operational Overview
  • Managing Individual Group Policy Types
  • Moving Forward
  • Chapter 13. Managing Active Directory Security
  • New Features in Windows Server 2003
  • Overview of Active Directory Security
  • Using Groups to Manage Active Directory Objects
  • Service Accounts
  • Using the Secondary Logon Service and RunAs
  • Using WMI for Active Directory Event Notification
  • Moving Forward
  • Chapter 14. Configuring Data Storage
  • New Features in Windows Server 2003
  • Functional Description of Windows Server 2003 Data Storage
  • Performing Disk Operations on IA32 Systems
  • Recovering Failed Fault Tolerant Disks
  • Working with GPT Disks
  • Moving Forward
  • Chapter 15. Managing File Systems
  • New Features in Windows Server 2003
  • Overview of Windows Server 2003 File Systems
  • NTFS Attributes
  • Link Tracking Service
  • Reparse Points
  • File System Recovery and Fault Tolerance
  • Quotas
  • File System Operations
  • Moving Forward
  • Chapter 16. Managing Shared Resources
  • New Features in Windows Server 2003
  • Functional Description of Windows Resource Sharing
  • Configuring File Sharing
  • Connecting to Shared Folders
  • Resource Sharing Using the Distributed File System (Dfs)
  • Printer Sharing
  • Configuring Windows Server 2003 Clients to Print
  • Managing Print Services
  • Moving Forward
  • Chapter 17. Managing File Encryption
  • New Features in Windows Server 2003
  • File Encryption Functional Description
  • Certificate Management
  • Encrypted File Recovery
  • Encrypting Server-Based Files
  • EFS File Transactions and WebDAV
  • Special EFS Guidelines
  • EFS Procedures
  • Moving Forward
  • Chapter 18. Managing a Public Key Infrastructure
  • New Features in Windows Server 2003
  • Moving Forward
  • PKI Goals
  • Cryptographic Elements in Windows Server 2003
  • Public/Private Key Services
  • Certificates
  • Certification Authorities
  • Certificate Enrollment
  • Key Archival and Recovery
  • Command-Line PKI Tools
  • Chapter 19. Managing the User Operating Environment
  • New Features in Windows Server 2003
  • Side-by-Side Assemblies
  • User State Migration
  • Managing Folder Redirection
  • Creating and Managing Home Directories
  • Managing Offline Files
  • Managing Servers via Remote Desktop
  • Moving Forward
  • Chapter 20. Managing Remote Access and Internet Routing
  • New Features in Windows Server 2003
  • Configuring a Network Bridge
  • Configuring Virtual Private Network Connections
  • Configuring Internet Authentication Services (IAS)
  • Moving Forward
  • Functional Description of WAN Device Support
  • PPP Authentication
  • NT4 RAS Servers and Active Directory Domains
  • Deploying Smart Cards for Remote Access
  • Installing and Configuring Modems
  • Configuring a Remote Access Server
  • Configuring a Demand-Dial Router
  • Configuring an Internet Gateway Using NAT
  • Chapter 21. Recovering from System Failures
  • New Features in Windows Server 2003
  • Functional Description Ntbackup
  • Backup and Restore Operations
  • Recovering from Blue Screen Stops
  • Using Emergency Management Services (EMS)
  • Using Safe Mode
  • Restoring Functionality with the Last Known Good Configuration
  • Recovery Console
  • Moving Forward
  • Who Should Read This Book
  • Who This Book Is Not For
  • Conventions
  • Acknowledgments
  • About the Author
  • About the Technical Reviewers
  • Index
  • Index A
  • Index B
  • Index C
  • Index D
  • Index E
  • Index F
  • Index G
  • Index H
  • Index I
  • Index J
  • Index K
  • Index L
  • Index M
  • Index N
  • Index O
  • Index P
  • Index Q
  • Index R
  • Index S
  • Index SYMBOL
  • Index T
  • Index U
  • Index V
  • Index W
  • Index X
  • Index Z
  • Preface
  • Previous Section Next Section

    New Features in Windows Server 2003

    Microsoft has done quite a bit of tuning on Active Directory in Windows Server 2003 to improve scalability and speed and to correct a couple of key deficiencies. Some of these updates might not make much sense until you read further, but here is a synopsis to use for reference. The first three features require having Windows Server 2003 on every domain controller:

    • Site scalability. The calculations for determining replication topology between sites have been streamlined. This corrects a problem where large organizations with hundreds of sites might experience replication failure because the topology calculations cannot be completed in the time allotted to them.

    • Backlink attribute replication. Group members are now replicated as discrete entities instead of replicating the entire group membership list as a single unit. This corrects a problem where membership changes made to the same group on different domain controllers in the same replication interval overwrite each other.

    • Federations. A new trust type called Forest was added to simplify transitive trust relationships between root domains in different forests. Using Forest trusts, it is possible to build a federation of independent Active Directory forests. This feature does not implement true "prune and graft" in Active Directory, but it goes a long way toward simplifying operations within affiliated organizations.

    • Simplified domain logon. Universal group membership can be cached at non-global catalog servers. This permits users to log on even if connectivity to a global catalog server is lost. This enhancement is coupled with a feature in XP where the domain\name result of cracking a User Principal Name (UPN) is cached locally. This permits a user at an XP desktop to log on with the format user@company.com even if a global catalog server is not available.

    • Application naming contexts. Windows Server 2003 introduces the capability to create new naming contexts to hold DNS record objects for Active Directory Integrated zones. One naming context holds domain zone records and one holds the _msdcs records used throughout a forest. These naming contexts make it possible to target replication of DNS zones only to domain controllers that are running DNS.

    • Eliminate piling onto new domain controllers. There is potential for a problem when an NT4 primary domain controller (PDC) is upgraded to Windows Server 2003. In this circumstance, all existing Windows 2000 and XP desktops will use the newly promoted PDC as a logon server. In Windows Server 2003, domain controllers can be configured to respond to modern Windows clients as if they were still classic NT domain controllers until sufficient domain controllers are available to handle local authentication. This feature is also available in Windows 2000 SP2 and later.

    • DNS diagnostics. Proper DNS configuration is critical for proper Active Directory operation. The Domain Controller promotion utility now performs a suite of DNS diagnostics to ensure that a suitable DNS server is available to register the service locator resource records associated with a Windows domain controller.

    • Fewer global catalog rebuilds. Adding or removing an attribute from the Global Catalog no longer requires a complete synchronization cycle. This minimizes the replication traffic caused by adding an attribute to the GC.

    • Management console enhancements. The Active Directory Users and Computers console now permits drag-and-drop move operations and modifying properties on multiple objects at the same time. There is also the capability of creating and storing custom LDAP queries to simplify managing large numbers of objects. The new MMC 2.0 console includes scripting support that can eliminate the need to use the console entirely.

    • Real-time LDAP. Support was added for RFC 2589, "LDAPv3: Extensions for Dynamic Directory Services." This permits putting time-sensitive information in Active Directory, such as a user's current location. Dynamic entries automatically time out and are deleted if they are not refreshed.

    • Enhanced LDAP security. Support was added for digest authentication as described in RFC 2829, "Authentication Methods for LDAP." This makes it easier to integrate Active Directory into non-Windows environments. Support was also added for RFC 2830, "LDAPv3: Extension for Transport Layer Security." This permits using secure connections when sending LDAP (Lightweight Directory Access Protocol) queries to a domain controller.

    • Schema enhancements. The ability was added to associate an auxiliary schema class to individual objects rather than to an entire class of objects. This association can be dynamic, making it possible to temporarily assign new attributes to a specific object or objects. Attributes and object classes can also be declared defunct to simplify recovering from programming errors.

    • LDAP query enhancements. The LDAP search mechanism was expanded to permit searching for individual entries in a multivalued Distinguished Name (DN) attribute. This is called an Attribute Scoped Query, or ASQ. For example, an ASQ could be used to quickly list every group to which a specific user belongs. Support was also added for Virtual List Views, a new LDAP control that permits large data sets to be viewed in order instead of paging through a random set of information. This change permits Windows Server 2003 to show alphabetically sorted lists of users and groups in pick lists.

    • Interoperability. Support was added for RFC 2798, "Definition of the inetOrgPerson LDAP Object Class." This enhances interoperability with Netscape and NetWare directory services, both of which use the inetOrgPerson object class to create User objects.

    • Speedier domain controller promotions. The capability was added for using a tape backup of the Active Directory database to populate the database on a new domain controller. This greatly simplifies domain controller deployments in situations where it is not practical to ship an entire server.

    • Scalability. The maximum number of objects that can be stored in Active Directory was increased to over one billion.

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