• Chapter 1. Installing and Configuring Windows Server 2003
  • software development Company Server 2003
  • Chapter 1. Installing and Configuring Windows Server 2003
  • New Features in Windows Server 2003
  • Best Practices
  • Moving Forward
  • Version Comparisons
  • Hardware Recommendations
  • Installation Checklist
  • Functional Overview of Windows Server 2003 Setup
  • Installing Windows Server 2003
  • Post Setup Configurations
  • Functional Description of the Windows Server 2003 Boot Process
  • Correcting Common Setup Problems
  • Chapter 2. Performing Upgrades and Automated Installations
  • New Features in Windows Server 2003
  • NT4 Upgrade Functional Overview
  • Upgrading an NT4 or Windows 2000 Server
  • Automating Windows Server 2003 Deployments
  • Moving Forward
  • Chapter 3. Adding Hardware
  • New Features in Windows Server 2003
  • Functional Description of Windows Server 2003 Architecture
  • Overview of Windows Server 2003 Plug and Play
  • Installing and Configuring Devices
  • Troubleshooting New Devices
  • Moving Forward
  • Chapter 4. Managing NetBIOS Name Resolution
  • New Features in Windows Server 2003
  • Moving Forward
  • Overview of Windows Server 2003 Networking
  • Name Resolution and Network Services
  • Network Diagnostic Utilities
  • Resolving NetBIOS Names Using Broadcasts
  • Resolving NetBIOS Names Using Lmhosts
  • Resolving NetBIOS Names Using WINS
  • Managing WINS
  • Disabling NetBIOS-over-TCP/IP Name Resolution
  • Chapter 5. Managing DNS
  • New Features in Windows Server 2003
  • Configuring a Caching-Only Server
  • Configuring a DNS Server to Use a Forwarder
  • Managing Dynamic DNS
  • Configuring Advanced DNS Server Parameters
  • Examining Zones with Nslookup
  • Command-Line Management of DNS
  • Configuring DHCP to Support DNS
  • Moving Forward
  • Overview of DNS Domain Structure
  • Functional Description of DNS Query Handling
  • Designing DNS Domains
  • Active Directory Integration
  • Configuring DNS Clients
  • Installing and Configuring DNS Servers
  • Configuring Secondary DNS Servers
  • Integrating DNS Zones into Active Directory
  • Chapter 6. Understanding Active Directory Services
  • New Features in Windows Server 2003
  • Active Directory Support Files
  • Active Directory Utilities
  • Bulk Imports and Exports
  • Moving Forward
  • Limitations of Classic NT Security
  • Directory Service Components
  • Brief History of Directory Services
  • X.500 Overview
  • LDAP Information Model
  • LDAP Namespace Structure
  • Active Directory Namespace Structure
  • Active Directory Schema
  • Chapter 7. Managing Active Directory Replication
  • New Features in Windows Server 2003
  • Replication Overview
  • Detailed Replication Transaction Descriptions
  • Designing Site Architectures
  • Configuring Inter-site Replication
  • Controlling Replication Parameters
  • Special Replication Operations
  • Troubleshooting Replication Problems
  • Moving Forward
  • Chapter 8. Designing Windows Server 2003 Domains
  • New Features in Windows Server 2003
  • Design Objectives
  • DNS and Active Directory Namespaces
  • Domain Design Strategies
  • Strategies for OU Design
  • Flexible Single Master Operations
  • Domain Controller Placement
  • Moving Forward
  • Chapter 9. Deploying Windows Server 2003 Domains
  • New Features in Windows Server 2003
  • Preparing for an NT Domain Upgrade
  • In-Place Upgrade of an NT4 Domain
  • In-Place Upgrade of a Windows 2000 Forest
  • Migrating from NT and Windows 2000 Domains to Windows Server 2003
  • Additional Domain Operations
  • Moving Forward
  • Chapter 10. Active Directory Maintenance
  • New Features in Windows Server 2003
  • Loss of a DNS Server
  • Loss of a Domain Controller
  • Loss of Key Replication Components
  • Backing Up the Directory
  • Performing Directory Maintenance
  • Moving Forward
  • Chapter 11. Understanding Network Access Security and Kerberos
  • New Features in Windows Server 2003
  • Windows Server 2003 Security Architecture
  • Security Components
  • Password Security
  • Authentication
  • Analysis of Kerberos Transactions
  • MITv5 Kerberos Interoperability
  • Security Auditing
  • Moving Forward
  • Chapter 12. Managing Group Policies
  • New Features in Windows Server 2003
  • Group Policy Operational Overview
  • Managing Individual Group Policy Types
  • Moving Forward
  • Chapter 13. Managing Active Directory Security
  • New Features in Windows Server 2003
  • Overview of Active Directory Security
  • Using Groups to Manage Active Directory Objects
  • Service Accounts
  • Using the Secondary Logon Service and RunAs
  • Using WMI for Active Directory Event Notification
  • Moving Forward
  • Chapter 14. Configuring Data Storage
  • New Features in Windows Server 2003
  • Functional Description of Windows Server 2003 Data Storage
  • Performing Disk Operations on IA32 Systems
  • Recovering Failed Fault Tolerant Disks
  • Working with GPT Disks
  • Moving Forward
  • Chapter 15. Managing File Systems
  • New Features in Windows Server 2003
  • Overview of Windows Server 2003 File Systems
  • NTFS Attributes
  • Link Tracking Service
  • Reparse Points
  • File System Recovery and Fault Tolerance
  • Quotas
  • File System Operations
  • Moving Forward
  • Chapter 16. Managing Shared Resources
  • New Features in Windows Server 2003
  • Functional Description of Windows Resource Sharing
  • Configuring File Sharing
  • Connecting to Shared Folders
  • Resource Sharing Using the Distributed File System (Dfs)
  • Printer Sharing
  • Configuring Windows Server 2003 Clients to Print
  • Managing Print Services
  • Moving Forward
  • Chapter 17. Managing File Encryption
  • New Features in Windows Server 2003
  • File Encryption Functional Description
  • Certificate Management
  • Encrypted File Recovery
  • Encrypting Server-Based Files
  • EFS File Transactions and WebDAV
  • Special EFS Guidelines
  • EFS Procedures
  • Moving Forward
  • Chapter 18. Managing a Public Key Infrastructure
  • New Features in Windows Server 2003
  • Moving Forward
  • PKI Goals
  • Cryptographic Elements in Windows Server 2003
  • Public/Private Key Services
  • Certificates
  • Certification Authorities
  • Certificate Enrollment
  • Key Archival and Recovery
  • Command-Line PKI Tools
  • Chapter 19. Managing the User Operating Environment
  • New Features in Windows Server 2003
  • Side-by-Side Assemblies
  • User State Migration
  • Managing Folder Redirection
  • Creating and Managing Home Directories
  • Managing Offline Files
  • Managing Servers via Remote Desktop
  • Moving Forward
  • Chapter 20. Managing Remote Access and Internet Routing
  • New Features in Windows Server 2003
  • Configuring a Network Bridge
  • Configuring Virtual Private Network Connections
  • Configuring Internet Authentication Services (IAS)
  • Moving Forward
  • Functional Description of WAN Device Support
  • PPP Authentication
  • NT4 RAS Servers and Active Directory Domains
  • Deploying Smart Cards for Remote Access
  • Installing and Configuring Modems
  • Configuring a Remote Access Server
  • Configuring a Demand-Dial Router
  • Configuring an Internet Gateway Using NAT
  • Chapter 21. Recovering from System Failures
  • New Features in Windows Server 2003
  • Functional Description Ntbackup
  • Backup and Restore Operations
  • Recovering from Blue Screen Stops
  • Using Emergency Management Services (EMS)
  • Using Safe Mode
  • Restoring Functionality with the Last Known Good Configuration
  • Recovery Console
  • Moving Forward
  • Who Should Read This Book
  • Who This Book Is Not For
  • Conventions
  • Acknowledgments
  • About the Author
  • About the Technical Reviewers
  • Index
  • Index A
  • Index B
  • Index C
  • Index D
  • Index E
  • Index F
  • Index G
  • Index H
  • Index I
  • Index J
  • Index K
  • Index L
  • Index M
  • Index N
  • Index O
  • Index P
  • Index Q
  • Index R
  • Index S
  • Index SYMBOL
  • Index T
  • Index U
  • Index V
  • Index W
  • Index X
  • Index Z
  • Preface
  • Previous Section Next Section

    New Features in Windows Server 2003

    Windows Server 2003 includes the following new DNS features that are not in Windows 2000:

    • Application naming contexts. If you use Active Directory Integrated zones, you can configure DNS to store the resource records in separate Active Directory naming contexts rather than putting them all in the Domain naming context. This simplifies zone replication in a large forest. An executable called Dnsadddp.exe runs each time a domain controller is booted. This application is responsible for creating the DNS application partitions if they do not already exist. See Chapter 7, "Managing Active Directory Replication," for more information on DNS naming contexts and replication.

    • DNS stub zones. This feature simplifies zone delegation. A stub zone contains the Start of Authority (SOA) and Name Server (NS) records associated with a child zone along with the A records for the name servers. The stub zone then periodically checks the child zone and pulls updates if the NS records have changed. This eliminates the need to manually update delegation records.

    • Conditional forwarding. This feature permits a name server to select a forwarder based on the domain specified in a client query rather than forwarding all out-of-zone queries to a single DNS server.

    • IPv6 host records. An IPv6 host address uses a 128-bit address space in contrast to the 32-bit address space used in IPv4. Windows Server 2003 DNS supports the AAAA host resource record that contains IPv6 addresses. This feature is based on RFC 1886, "DNS Extensions to Support IP Version 6." Windows Server 2003 does not include support for the newly proposed A6 resource record type and the proposed restructuring of the IPv6 reverse lookup zone outlined in RFC 2874, "DNS Extensions to Support IPv6 Address Aggregation and Renumbering."

    • DNS extensions. The current DNS implementation uses UDP for exchanging information between name servers and clients. The standard UDP datagram is limited to 512 octets. Many new and proposed DNS features require more than 512 octets. Currently, this requires a setup and teardown of a TCP session when delivering large resource records, adding overhead and complexity. Windows Server 2003 permits a client and name server to negotiate a larger datagram size, if possible. This feature is based on RFC 2671, "Extension Mechanisms for DNS (EDNS0)."

    • Reverse lookup zone subnetting. In Windows Server 2003, if you use non-standard subnet masking, you can specify the subnet mask as part of the reverse lookup zone name. This enables the system to apportion Pointer (PTR) records to the correct subnet.

    If you are an NT administrator, you'll find many improvements in Windows Server 2003 that were carried over from Windows 2000. These include the following:

    • Notification-driven zone transfers. Standard DNS requires secondary name servers to poll a master name server for updates. Windows 2000 and Windows Server 2003 incorporate notification features that let a master name server inform its secondaries when an update has occurred. The secondaries then replicate immediately, greatly shortening convergence times. This feature is based on RFC 1996, "A Mechanism for Prompt Notification of Zone Changes."

    • Incremental zone transfers. Standard DNS replication transfers the entire contents of a zone file from a master name server to its secondaries for every update. Windows 2000 and Windows Server 2003 permit a secondary name server to request only those changes that have occurred since the last zone transfer. This significantly reduces replication traffic, making it possible to locate secondary name servers at the end of slow network connections. This feature is based on RFC 1995, "Incremental Zone Transfer In DNS."

    • Service locator records. Many services need a way to "publish" their existence so that clients can find them. Windows 2000 and Windows Server 2003 support the service locator, or SRV, resource record. The SRV record specifies a service name, its protocol (TCP or UDP), its port number, and the server or servers where it can be found. This feature is based on RFC 2782, "A DNS RR for specifying the location of services (DNS SRV)."

    • Active Directory Integrated zones. DNS resource records can be stored in the Active Directory and updated by any domain controller running DNS. This eliminates the bottleneck of a single primary master server in standard DNS. This feature is proprietary to Windows 2000 and Windows Server 2003.

    • Negative query caching. All DNS clients cache query results to minimize load on the name servers and reduce network traffic. Windows 2000 and Windows Server 2003 both support caching of negative query responses. This prevents a client from repeatedly querying for a record that does not exist. This feature is based on RFC 2308, "Negative Caching of DNS Queries (DNS NCACHE)."

    • Secure DNS Updates. Dynamic DNS Updates can be limited exclusively to trusted clients. This helps prevent attacks designed to populate a zone with false resource records that could send users or user data to unsecured locations. There are two primary Standards Track RFCs that describe how to perform secure DNS Updates: RFC 2535, "Domain Name System Security Extensions," and RFC 2930, "Secret Key Establishment for DNS." Windows 2000 does not support these RFCs at all and Windows Server 2003 only provides basic support. Secure DNS Updates in Windows Server 2003 continue to use the proprietary method introduced in Windows 2000.

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