• Chapter 1. Installing and Configuring Windows Server 2003
  • software development Company Server 2003
  • Chapter 1. Installing and Configuring Windows Server 2003
  • New Features in Windows Server 2003
  • Best Practices
  • Moving Forward
  • Version Comparisons
  • Hardware Recommendations
  • Installation Checklist
  • Functional Overview of Windows Server 2003 Setup
  • Installing Windows Server 2003
  • Post Setup Configurations
  • Functional Description of the Windows Server 2003 Boot Process
  • Correcting Common Setup Problems
  • Chapter 2. Performing Upgrades and Automated Installations
  • New Features in Windows Server 2003
  • NT4 Upgrade Functional Overview
  • Upgrading an NT4 or Windows 2000 Server
  • Automating Windows Server 2003 Deployments
  • Moving Forward
  • Chapter 3. Adding Hardware
  • New Features in Windows Server 2003
  • Functional Description of Windows Server 2003 Architecture
  • Overview of Windows Server 2003 Plug and Play
  • Installing and Configuring Devices
  • Troubleshooting New Devices
  • Moving Forward
  • Chapter 4. Managing NetBIOS Name Resolution
  • New Features in Windows Server 2003
  • Moving Forward
  • Overview of Windows Server 2003 Networking
  • Name Resolution and Network Services
  • Network Diagnostic Utilities
  • Resolving NetBIOS Names Using Broadcasts
  • Resolving NetBIOS Names Using Lmhosts
  • Resolving NetBIOS Names Using WINS
  • Managing WINS
  • Disabling NetBIOS-over-TCP/IP Name Resolution
  • Chapter 5. Managing DNS
  • New Features in Windows Server 2003
  • Configuring a Caching-Only Server
  • Configuring a DNS Server to Use a Forwarder
  • Managing Dynamic DNS
  • Configuring Advanced DNS Server Parameters
  • Examining Zones with Nslookup
  • Command-Line Management of DNS
  • Configuring DHCP to Support DNS
  • Moving Forward
  • Overview of DNS Domain Structure
  • Functional Description of DNS Query Handling
  • Designing DNS Domains
  • Active Directory Integration
  • Configuring DNS Clients
  • Installing and Configuring DNS Servers
  • Configuring Secondary DNS Servers
  • Integrating DNS Zones into Active Directory
  • Chapter 6. Understanding Active Directory Services
  • New Features in Windows Server 2003
  • Active Directory Support Files
  • Active Directory Utilities
  • Bulk Imports and Exports
  • Moving Forward
  • Limitations of Classic NT Security
  • Directory Service Components
  • Brief History of Directory Services
  • X.500 Overview
  • LDAP Information Model
  • LDAP Namespace Structure
  • Active Directory Namespace Structure
  • Active Directory Schema
  • Chapter 7. Managing Active Directory Replication
  • New Features in Windows Server 2003
  • Replication Overview
  • Detailed Replication Transaction Descriptions
  • Designing Site Architectures
  • Configuring Inter-site Replication
  • Controlling Replication Parameters
  • Special Replication Operations
  • Troubleshooting Replication Problems
  • Moving Forward
  • Chapter 8. Designing Windows Server 2003 Domains
  • New Features in Windows Server 2003
  • Design Objectives
  • DNS and Active Directory Namespaces
  • Domain Design Strategies
  • Strategies for OU Design
  • Flexible Single Master Operations
  • Domain Controller Placement
  • Moving Forward
  • Chapter 9. Deploying Windows Server 2003 Domains
  • New Features in Windows Server 2003
  • Preparing for an NT Domain Upgrade
  • In-Place Upgrade of an NT4 Domain
  • In-Place Upgrade of a Windows 2000 Forest
  • Migrating from NT and Windows 2000 Domains to Windows Server 2003
  • Additional Domain Operations
  • Moving Forward
  • Chapter 10. Active Directory Maintenance
  • New Features in Windows Server 2003
  • Loss of a DNS Server
  • Loss of a Domain Controller
  • Loss of Key Replication Components
  • Backing Up the Directory
  • Performing Directory Maintenance
  • Moving Forward
  • Chapter 11. Understanding Network Access Security and Kerberos
  • New Features in Windows Server 2003
  • Windows Server 2003 Security Architecture
  • Security Components
  • Password Security
  • Authentication
  • Analysis of Kerberos Transactions
  • MITv5 Kerberos Interoperability
  • Security Auditing
  • Moving Forward
  • Chapter 12. Managing Group Policies
  • New Features in Windows Server 2003
  • Group Policy Operational Overview
  • Managing Individual Group Policy Types
  • Moving Forward
  • Chapter 13. Managing Active Directory Security
  • New Features in Windows Server 2003
  • Overview of Active Directory Security
  • Using Groups to Manage Active Directory Objects
  • Service Accounts
  • Using the Secondary Logon Service and RunAs
  • Using WMI for Active Directory Event Notification
  • Moving Forward
  • Chapter 14. Configuring Data Storage
  • New Features in Windows Server 2003
  • Functional Description of Windows Server 2003 Data Storage
  • Performing Disk Operations on IA32 Systems
  • Recovering Failed Fault Tolerant Disks
  • Working with GPT Disks
  • Moving Forward
  • Chapter 15. Managing File Systems
  • New Features in Windows Server 2003
  • Overview of Windows Server 2003 File Systems
  • NTFS Attributes
  • Link Tracking Service
  • Reparse Points
  • File System Recovery and Fault Tolerance
  • Quotas
  • File System Operations
  • Moving Forward
  • Chapter 16. Managing Shared Resources
  • New Features in Windows Server 2003
  • Functional Description of Windows Resource Sharing
  • Configuring File Sharing
  • Connecting to Shared Folders
  • Resource Sharing Using the Distributed File System (Dfs)
  • Printer Sharing
  • Configuring Windows Server 2003 Clients to Print
  • Managing Print Services
  • Moving Forward
  • Chapter 17. Managing File Encryption
  • New Features in Windows Server 2003
  • File Encryption Functional Description
  • Certificate Management
  • Encrypted File Recovery
  • Encrypting Server-Based Files
  • EFS File Transactions and WebDAV
  • Special EFS Guidelines
  • EFS Procedures
  • Moving Forward
  • Chapter 18. Managing a Public Key Infrastructure
  • New Features in Windows Server 2003
  • Moving Forward
  • PKI Goals
  • Cryptographic Elements in Windows Server 2003
  • Public/Private Key Services
  • Certificates
  • Certification Authorities
  • Certificate Enrollment
  • Key Archival and Recovery
  • Command-Line PKI Tools
  • Chapter 19. Managing the User Operating Environment
  • New Features in Windows Server 2003
  • Side-by-Side Assemblies
  • User State Migration
  • Managing Folder Redirection
  • Creating and Managing Home Directories
  • Managing Offline Files
  • Managing Servers via Remote Desktop
  • Moving Forward
  • Chapter 20. Managing Remote Access and Internet Routing
  • New Features in Windows Server 2003
  • Configuring a Network Bridge
  • Configuring Virtual Private Network Connections
  • Configuring Internet Authentication Services (IAS)
  • Moving Forward
  • Functional Description of WAN Device Support
  • PPP Authentication
  • NT4 RAS Servers and Active Directory Domains
  • Deploying Smart Cards for Remote Access
  • Installing and Configuring Modems
  • Configuring a Remote Access Server
  • Configuring a Demand-Dial Router
  • Configuring an Internet Gateway Using NAT
  • Chapter 21. Recovering from System Failures
  • New Features in Windows Server 2003
  • Functional Description Ntbackup
  • Backup and Restore Operations
  • Recovering from Blue Screen Stops
  • Using Emergency Management Services (EMS)
  • Using Safe Mode
  • Restoring Functionality with the Last Known Good Configuration
  • Recovery Console
  • Moving Forward
  • Who Should Read This Book
  • Who This Book Is Not For
  • Conventions
  • Acknowledgments
  • About the Author
  • About the Technical Reviewers
  • Index
  • Index A
  • Index B
  • Index C
  • Index D
  • Index E
  • Index F
  • Index G
  • Index H
  • Index I
  • Index J
  • Index K
  • Index L
  • Index M
  • Index N
  • Index O
  • Index P
  • Index Q
  • Index R
  • Index S
  • Index SYMBOL
  • Index T
  • Index U
  • Index V
  • Index W
  • Index X
  • Index Z
  • Preface
  • Previous Section Next Section

    New Features in Windows Server 2003

    The most significant differences in hardware support come from the IA64 versions of Windows Server 2003. This includes the following:

    • New memory architecture to support a larger address space

    • Support for 64-bit device architectures such as PCI-X (this support is also included higher-end IA32 systems)

    • Improved drive partitioning using GUID Partition Tables (GPT) rather than legacy Master Boot Record (MBR) partitioning

    • Application interoperability using the Windows32-on-Windows64 (WOW64) emulator

    • Registry and system file interoperability so that 32-bit and 64-bit versions of the same applications don't conflict with each other

    Beyond the support for an entirely new platform, the watchwords for hardware support in Windows Server 2003 are sustainability and recoverability:

    • Driver Protection. A new database has been introduced in Windows Server 2003 that acts as a "bad-boy" list of drivers that are known to cause problems. If you attempt to install a device using one of these drivers, the system prompts you with a warning and refuses to do the installation. The list is kept current via Windows Update. For details, see www.microsoft.com/hwdev/driver/drvprotect.htm.

    • Windows Update. This feature was first introduced in Windows 2000 and has been improved in Windows Server 2003. You can choose to automatically download digitally signed updates from Microsoft or you can download them manually to a central server for evaluation and testing prior to internal deployment. The Software Update Service (SUS) from Microsoft automates the download of updates to a central server where they can be deployed after testing.

    • Driver Rollback. If you upgrade a device driver and the server becomes unstable, you can use Driver Rollback to return to the old driver. This is an improvement over the Last Known Good Configuration gambit, which restores the pre-existing Registry entries but not the drivers themselves.

    • Larger Registry size. The Registry size in Windows Server 2003 is limited only by the available space on the operating system volume. Previous versions of Windows, including Windows 2000, imposed a Registry size limit (RSL) of about 80 percent of paged pool memory. This change significantly improves the scalability of terminal servers, where each concurrent user has a copy of the user profile loaded in memory.

    • New Registry structure. Related portions of the Registry (called cells) are now kept closer together, with better support for large cells. This improves seek and load times.

    • Improved debugging. Changes to the kernel and kernel-mode debugging tools have improved the ability of developers to tighten their code. We, as system administrators, benefit because we can use the same tools for troubleshooting.

    • Improved memory usage. Changes to the way paged pool memory is allocated in Windows Server 2003 greatly conserves memory and makes it possible to handle very large files during backups. Also, the system now allocates identical 4K memory pages by assignment rather than by copying, which prevents applications such as web services from using lots of memory doling out the same information to different users. The total number of contiguous memory pages has been doubled to improve support for terminal servers and applications that require large datasets.

    • Large driver support. The amount of memory available to a driver has been increased from about 200K in Windows 2000 to 1GB in Windows Server 2003. This improvement is especially good news for video adapter manufacturers.

    • Hot memory addition. High-availability servers such as Stratus ftServers and the new IBM Summit technology servers give administrators the ability to add memory while a machine is running. Windows Server 2003 supports this feature by dynamically resizing memory when the new RAM is added. This does not work in reverse, however. If memory must be removed for swapping, the server must be shut down.

    • Improved multiprocessor support. Classic Symmetric Multiprocessor (SMP) servers share their processors on a single bus, which creates bottlenecks. Newer servers use a cache-coherent Non-Uniform Memory Allocation (ccNUMA) scheme for sharing processors. In ccNUMA, processors are married to RAM that is physically situated nearby. These sections of closely allied CPU and RAM connect to each other via a series of crossbars in much the same way that cities in southern California are connected together by freeways. Windows Server 2003 supports ccNUMA architecture by allocating memory calls between "near" memory and "far" memory so that threads and memory stay in the same location.

    • Improved DMA handling. If you have advanced ATA drives that take advantage of the fast transfer speeds provided by UltraDMA (Direct Memory Access), you'll be happy to know that Windows Server 2003 does a much better job of determining the correct DMA mode for a device than earlier Windows operating systems. Also, Windows Server 2003 dynamically evaluates the DMA performance of a device and shifts it to PIO (Programmed I/O) operating if it fails DMA too often. This helps maintain support for older CD-ROM devices.

    • Improved Device Removal handling. Although it is not common to yank components off a running server, you may have servers with removable drives or Universal Serial Bus (USB) peripherals. The proper way to remove a device is to inform the operating system first, but surprise removals are more the rule than the exception. Windows Server 2003 prepares for the surprise removal of drives and drive media by disabling write caching on all removable media drives except IEEE 1394 FireWire.

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